DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM AND GIS

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WHAT IS DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM

Most people think that a decision support system (DSS) is just a recent concept, but the fact is, it has been here for many years. Decision support systems, in general, are a series of methodologies for physical or automated techniques of decision-making. However, in the modern work context, DSS is widely seen as computer-based data management to address complex organizational issues or concerns that support businesspeople, administrators, and executives. DSS has been known in recent years as a conceivably helpful tool for small and medium sized businesses.

An elegant DSS allows analysts to gather diverse information from various inputs like available raw information, reports, particular knowledge from administrators, executives, and business strategies.

HOW DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM WORKS WITH GIS?

DSS method is strongly aligned to Geographic Information System in the form of Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS). SDSSs provide computer-based integrated technologies created for efficient decision-making to address geographical decision challenges. Decision support is a healthy way to encourage innovative information management methods of geospatial processing to answer spatial decision concerns.

Maps and physical attributes in SDSS can represent the results and links among entities, such as to address prominent air pollution and disease prevalence issues.

TOOLS USED FOR DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM IN SPATIAL PLANNING?

  1. Basic programming languages libraries such as Visual Basics, TransCAD – Caliper Script macro language, MapInfo – MapBasic
  2. Public Participatory GIS tool (PGIS)
  3. Planning and assessment of future developments for land management (PALM)
  4. GISystems for example ARC/INFO, ArcView, ARCNetwork, Spatial Analyst, MapObjects LT, GRASS, IDRISI, MapInfo, TransCAD
  5. Statistical and geostatistical software such as S-PLUS, SPSS, SAS
  6. Spatial Modeling Environments are also used as similar tools

This paper would biefly explains about the participatory GIS tool and its use in a case study.

PARTICIPATORY GIS (PGIS)

PGIS is the fusion of Geograhic Information Technology & System and Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) techniques. PGIS implementation focuses on using spatial data processing methods in order to formulate an individual’s spatial awareness in schematic diagrams, interactive 2D, 3D models to aerial photographs, satellite images, and Location-based services, and the use of dynamic platforms for communication and information system.

PGIS typically aims to motivate the citizens by user-friendly, interactive GIT software. Internet polling and face-to-face discussions and meetings are the most straightforward information-gathering methods in PGIS.

CASE STUDY – VALUATION OF PUBLIC PARTICIPAION CAPAILIY IN MALASIAN LAND-USE PLANNING 2017

In Malasia 2017, a survey was conducted to investigate the public’s ability to contribute to spatial planning decisions using participatory GIS (PGIS). An open-source PGIS was acquired through facilitated and self-administered strategies by the citizens using spatial attributes and regions identified by professionals compared to land use that defines locational values and land-uses choices.

A Google Maps® API was used to set up a PGIS web server that has the following functionalities:

  1. a login page with the submission and authentication of the encryption key
  2. a confirmation window
  3. a collection of pre-mapping messages for recognition of residency (How respondents heard about the experiment and what they knew about land use)
  4. a Google Street view display with three interactive tracker pans that can be scroll on the map
  5. a section containing additional queries to describe the traits of the participants.

The PGIS performance was assessed by evaluating the mapping effort of respondents and the uniformity of results gained within the land-use areas.

The defined positions of 24 features (water-bodies, housing, coast, forest, public park, and bare land, commercial area, and services, industrial area, institution, and municipal facility, and agriculture) were geographically lined with nine surface areas in the estimation of the accuracy of mapped PGIS results.

The study found that the facilitated PGIS approach yielded excellent geographic information than the self-administered survey. Therefore, the facilitated PGIS approach should e opted for future analysis. It also revealed PGIS could provide a feasible forum to promote community participation in Malaysia’s urban planning.

 

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